Gouache

The Japanese Salon, Villa Hügel, Hietzing, Vienna Rudolf von Alt 1855

From the collection of Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum This salon exhibits a riot of Chinese/Japanese motifs. The walls are ...
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The Library in the Apartment of Count Lanckoronski in Vienna, Riemergasse 8 Rudolf von Alt 1881

The Library in the Apartment of Count Lanckoronski in Vienna, Riemergasse 8 Rudolf von Alt 1881 From the collection of ...
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Salon in the Apartment of Count Lanckoronski in Vienna Rudolf von Alt 1881

Salon in the Apartment of Count Lanckoronski in Vienna Rudolf von Alt 1881 From the collection of Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian ...
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“Sambo” Hand Puppet Ruth Abramsc. 1937

“Sambo” Hand Puppet Ruth Abramsc. 1937 From the collection of National Gallery of Art, Washington DC Details Title: “Sambo” Hand ...
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Commercially manufactured opaque watercolour paint popular with designers, illustrators and airbrush artists. The term also, and more correctly, refers to the use of opaque watercolours in a loosely defined area of technique and the materials and effects associated with such painting. Gouache, also called bodycolour, is simply water-based paint rendered opaque by the addition of white paint or pigment (e.g. Chinese white) or a white substance, such as chalk or even marble dust. It is an evolved form of tempera paint, descended from distemper. The application of the term gouache is often imprecise, but it is most often associated with colours bound in glue-size or gum. The commercial product varies considerably. It is usually bound with gum arabic or dextrin. An inferior version is known as poster colour or poster paint. Gouache produces flat, matt, even colour, and, being thinned with water for use, it is a convenient and quick medium to employ, hence its continuing popularity with designers and illustrators.