Jacques-François Deparis

Jaques-François Paris (or Jaques-François Deparis 1735 – 1797), is french Designer, He is known by his Soft-paste porcelain, painted and gilded Vase and Cover.

Described in the archives of the Sèvres Porcelain Manufactory as “well built…with a big black beard as well as black hair, soft voice…a wise man, interested in his work, who always tries to improve,”

Jacques-François Deparis spent his entire life as a répareur, molding and sculpting porcelain. He came to the Vincennes Porcelain Manufactory when he was eleven and worked as an apprentice for three years without pay, making the handles and spouts of vessels. Promoted first to be the assistant for the designer Jean-Claude Duplessis, Deparis became chef des répareurs (head of the répareurs) in 1774, when Duplessis died. In his new role, Deparis designed vases and tablewares and headed the soft-paste porcelain workshop. As chef, he received the added bonus of free accommodation and heating.

Between 1778 and 1782, Sèvres manufactured for Louis XVI a series of vases with handles shaped as busts of infants, young women, and old men, hence the name “vases des âges.” The Walters’ examples, with the infants and a “bleu nouveau” ground color, bear classical scenes and an additional decoration of “jewels” composed of enamel drops over gold foil. The classical scenes are derived from an illustrated edition of Télémaque, a romance set in antiquity written by Fénélon in 1699. This vase shows Telemachus, the son of Ulysses, winning a chariot race. The other side of the vase has a reserve decorated with floral motifs.This vase and its pair were designed by Jacques-François Deparis. The painting was by Antoine Caton, the gilding by Etienne-Henry Le Guay, and the jewels by Philippe Parpette.

This vase is decorated with a mythological scene, “The Sacrifice of Iphigenia,” and bears an additional decoration of imitations of jewels composed of enamel drops over gold foil. The oviform vase has a blue (so called “bleu nouveau”) ground and is decorated with a mythological scene, “The Sacrifice of Iphigenia,” from Ovid’s Metamorphosis on one side, and a landscape on the other. It bears an additional decoration of “jewels” composed of enamel drops over gold foil (pearls, rossettes, strawberry leaves, laurel leaves, and berries in white, green, and orange) around these scenes, and on the neck, foot, and cover. The pierced and gilded handles run along the full length of the vase.